Lost Story: 💕 Finding inscriptions in #oldbooks!! #Read this one from 1835!

In 1835 a Mr. Hayden W. Dooley journaled this inside Vol. 2 of Hawks of Hawk Hollow, a play by Robert Montgomery Bird, while waiting for a train:

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“Arrived here at Hamilton at 9 o’clock and being just 5 minutes too late for the Oxford train the next thing is to prepare ourselves for a long tedious six hours “set” intermingled with short “walks” and little talks. Eating “knickknacks” and thinking about home after an absence of several days. I know it would do anyone interested in our welfare to see our long faces today caused by our disappointment however I believe shall throw dull care away and be a Hamiltonian while here. Strangers are beginning to gather in the depot for the next train. It bothers me a little in writing my [sic] I must grit and take it. There are several in waiting for 12 o’clock train. It is almost impossible to take in account the ruffles, fruffles and folds and twists which adorned most, I say, sensible girls. One lady sitting opposite me with a black [sic] dress on trimmed in puffed about in black silk well as near as I can tell she is a puff anyway held together with a massive gold watch and chain. She is gone now. It is half after 12 o’clock.” .

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This is the oldest book I own. I only have vol. 2.

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Reviewing the book of John

I will share with you my first journal entry I wrote after reading this book which is one of the four Gospels. Starts with a quote then my thoughts:

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“Jesus replied, “Very truly I tell you, no one can see the kingdom of God unless they are born again.” – John 3:3

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I have been working on an essay concerning the term ‘born again’. The term was akin to a curse word in our family growing up, as we had bad experiences with born again Christians which completely turned some of us off religion. Though I would say reading scripture solidified my journey in faith, so that I have indeed been born again. But no one laid hands on me to do it. No one said, ‘you are now saved’. These kind of theatrics reek of BS. 

I believe the transformation happens internally in many private “conversations” you have with your own spirit, your own soul. So to say I’m born again sounds strange to some people, and I wouldn’t just say it because they wouldn’t understand (yet I just said it). 

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What I mean to say is that I killed a part of myself off (the cynical & proud) and dove deeper into my own spirituality, made it richer and fuller and was therefore born anew in my own faith. But rather, instead of calling myself born again, do I dare say I was resurrected?

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I think I would.

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What about you?   

Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss

⭐️⭐️⭐️ Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss

I set a backdrop of all my previous versions of my first novel, which I could not get published, so I went the kdp route (though I have been traditionally published since). I think I’ve edited it 100 times now (including formatting) and being my first book I’m a little embarrassed by it (hence the pseudonym), but at the same time it is precious to me, because it was my first. Even though my writing style has advanced, changed, and has grown more concise, I love the story and could sit through it 100 more times! I think many authors feel this way about their first book.

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Lynne Truss’ book didn’t tell me anything I didn’t know, though I found it cheeky and entertaining. I was hoping more for advice on when to use an em-dash instead of a comma—stuff like that. I think this book is more for people who might not understand possessives, commas, and the like. Though when to use a comma is still a grey area for me, as I’m sure I use them more than needed. 🤷‍♀️ Anyone get anything good out if it?

#books #bookshelf #bibliophile #library #booknerd #bookgeek #grammar #eatsshootsandleaves #booksandloststories #panda #bookstagram #bookclub #book #bookworm #booknerdigans #bookphotography #published #authorsofinstagram #writersofinstagram #readersofinstagram #reading #writing

Absalom, Absalom! By William Faulkner

⭐️⭐️ Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner. Did anyone like it? Anyone? I felt as if I were in that dark shuttered-up parlor the whole time with that old woman character—like for real. That’s how the story was, very dark, not in feeling but rather in what I could see of the story and what I couldn’t. I had to excuse myself more than once from my usual reading spot to hide in a closet or my bedroom only to come away with the slightest gist of Faulkner’s meaning from one paragraph! One paragraph!! The lucidity if the story was as muddy as the window in this picture. (I’ll wash it later). I hated the whole experience. I’ll be honest. But Faulkner accomplished what he set out to do. I admire him for this, as his goal was to make the reader feel lost as they try to navigate the truth of a family’s history based on three 😬different stories told after the fact. Correct me if I’m wrong, but that is how I remember it. Please comment below if you have any thoughts on this terrible, yet, brilliant piece. 😄

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I bought this 1951 copy in Brooklyn from a street vendor at which point my brother says, “oooh Absalom, Absalom!, I’ve heard that’s a hard one. He doesn’t use a lot of punctuation.” He was right. I couldn’t resist the vintage Modern Library cover art though.

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#bookish #bookshelf #bibliophile #booksofinstagram #bookphotography #booknerdigans #readersofinstagram #books #reading #amreading #amwriting #bookgeek #booknerd #literature #bookishfeatures #bookadict #booksandloststories

Josie Underwood’s Civil War Diary!!

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Josie Underwood’s Civil War Diary will be the most romantic, beautifully written diary you’ll ever read!! This book is referenced throughout Winston Groom’s Shiloh where he highlights the love story between Josie, a Kentuckian, and a confederate soldier, Tom Grafton. I fell in love with this and often think of writing a musical play for it! 😀

…. If you ever go to the Mammoth caves in Kentucky you can see her signature inside one of the caves. I just happen to ask our tour guide this when we went through one year and he said, yes, she was there in 1860ish and indeed signed one of the famous cave ceilings with candle soot, like many visitors did back then. She also is the only person I know of who has documented seeing Lincoln ride without an entourage to the soldier’s home. I wrote the author of Lincoln’s Sanctuary about this after he stated that Lincoln never rode alone to the soldiers home. He wrote back a little perturbed and said he had realized this after publication and would include it in the second edition. 🙃

…. This is a recent hardcover, pictured against a genuine civil war soldier mug and a collage I made for my civil war tintypes.

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#bibliophile #civilwar #civilwarhistory #antiques #bookstagram #readersofinstagram #amreading #amwriting #bookshelf #reading #library #book #lincoln #america

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Beautiful in its simplicity is The Old Man and The Sea. I really enjoyed this book! Nothing really going on yet questions are raised and answers are given in a short span of time. A book about an old man’s perseverance holding on to the biggest catch of his life. He is painted as a humble man, a simple man, yet determined to make meaning out of his life. I want to be this man! It’s a short book only 118 pages.

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Pictured is an artful 1965 paperback which I stole (borrowed) from my brother’s collection unbeknownst to him. Hi Brad! It’s set against my weird art, Sea Creatures made with driftwood and a strange creation of mine, Red Sky At Night.

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My Summer in a Garden by Charles Dudley Warner

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ As the summer draws to a close I’m compelled to remember the stages of my garden with Mr. Charles Dudley Warner. In 1870 he documented one summer in his garden recording every week. He talks about women voting, his neighbor Harriet Beecher Stowe, the visit to his garden by Ulysses S. Grant, and the curious life of his pet cat, Calvin. I read this on a road trip to Cleveland where I visited the most beautiful cemetery I had ever seen. (Pics of family crypts posted below)

Reaching the end of this book, with my kids and husband in the car, all restless, hyper, and obnoxious, I began to cry because Warner’s beloved cat was dying. He described his passing in such beautiful detail while granting the animal humility and grace. My family saw I was crying and made fun, of course, but I couldn’t stop and continued shedding my tears—laughing at myself also—as we checked into our hotel. .

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Pictured is the 1888 edition. Some weathering with inscription: Lizzie W. Nothe (?) from Parents—Xmas 1889 .

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