Idylls of the King by Alfred Lord Tennyson

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Idylls of the King by Alfred Lord Tennyson is an epic poem about King Arthur and the Knights of the round table. They search for the Holy Grail which is an allegory for material possessions. SPOILER ALERT: most only find wandering fires. 🔥 😉

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Yes, I read this. And would probably read it again! 💕

I loved the musical ‘Camelot’, used to pretend to conduct its orchestra when I was a little girl—I know, I’m a total nerd!

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PICTURED IS AN ILLUSTRATED COPY 1939 EDITION IN EXCELLENT CONDITION, THOUGH THE DUST JACKET IS A TAD WORN. 😘

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The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Beautiful in its simplicity is The Old Man and The Sea. I really enjoyed this book! Nothing really going on yet questions are raised and answers are given in a short span of time. A book about an old man’s perseverance holding on to the biggest catch of his life. He is painted as a humble man, a simple man, yet determined to make meaning out of his life. I want to be this man! It’s a short book only 118 pages.

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Pictured is an artful 1965 paperback which I stole (borrowed) from my brother’s collection unbeknownst to him. Hi Brad! It’s set against my weird art, Sea Creatures made with driftwood and a strange creation of mine, Red Sky At Night.

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My Summer in a Garden by Charles Dudley Warner

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ As the summer draws to a close I’m compelled to remember the stages of my garden with Mr. Charles Dudley Warner. In 1870 he documented one summer in his garden recording every week. He talks about women voting, his neighbor Harriet Beecher Stowe, the visit to his garden by Ulysses S. Grant, and the curious life of his pet cat, Calvin. I read this on a road trip to Cleveland where I visited the most beautiful cemetery I had ever seen. (Pics of family crypts posted below)

Reaching the end of this book, with my kids and husband in the car, all restless, hyper, and obnoxious, I began to cry because Warner’s beloved cat was dying. He described his passing in such beautiful detail while granting the animal humility and grace. My family saw I was crying and made fun, of course, but I couldn’t stop and continued shedding my tears—laughing at myself also—as we checked into our hotel. .

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Pictured is the 1888 edition. Some weathering with inscription: Lizzie W. Nothe (?) from Parents—Xmas 1889 .

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Find me on Instagram!! @booksandloststories

Hello Everyone,

As some of you know I have an extensive collection of old books–the pic above is only one shelf of four. 😂. They are so beautiful, and the ones I’ve read have stayed with me for years, so I started a little Instagram blog called, ‘Books and Lost Stories.’

I recently got a book deal so I’m amping up my social media game. I’m not a natural at it. I hate the idea of promoting myself, but I do have things to say and things to share which I think will brighten the world and inspire those who might feel lost sometimes. So I’m forcing myself to get out of my comfort zone.

I share each post of my books on WordPress just to spread the inspiration. I’ve been at it for a week, so far I have 31 followers–womp, womp. But I’m happy for the 31! Come follow me there! Instagram is a great way to get a (somewhat) real sense of who a person is behind the words and obscure photos. I always follow anyone who follows me. Thank you!!

Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ Amidst some of my free writing journals, grammar and spelling mistakes galore, is the first book I read before I sat down to write my first novel. It is like food, cure for writer’s block, and other writing ailments. I still remember and take to heart much of Goldberg’s advice. I read it in college too, but with all the other papers and tests I didn’t give it the attention I should have. I highly recommend it to any writer or writer in the making. 👏🏻 .

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Pictured is the 1986 edition in excellent condition. .

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Disenchanted by Pierre Loti

⭐️ ⭐️ Possibly one of the first feminist books ever! Written in 1906.

Disenchanted by Pierre Loti

Fictional author André Lhéry befriends three Turkish women who must wear a full Burkas when they speak with him. He is struck by—what he sees as—their oppression, yet moved to see a bit of a cheek or a wrist. The women conceal a mystery all the more alluring. I only gave this a two though. I found it a bit slow.

Womp. Womp. 🤷‍♀️

Pictured is the 1913 edition. The cover has seen better days, but the inside condition is good. Betcha it was a beauty in 1913!

I think this worn image symbolizes the garden trellis featured in the story…what is only partially seen, we never really know the whole truth, etc.

Days of Wrath by Andre Malraux

🇺🇸 On a day just like today,

though the sky was bright,

clear, and blue,

I present to you this

truth in one, Andre Malraux.

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⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️A story about a communist prisoner in a Nazi concentration camp in the days leading up to World War II. Mostly it contains the protagonist’s rambling thoughts and efforts to not to go mad. Though I read it a couple years ago I remember enjoying it.

Pictured is the 1936 edition. The inscription indicates a brother giving this as a gift to his brother, or perhaps he’s a theologian, who seems to be going on a long journey. “Come back sober,” he writes.

Yes, I think we should all come back sober, like we did that day. We came back sober to our homes, to our radios, and television sets, but today as we do so, we come back with gratitude. .

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In memory of the 9/11 victims. 💕 🇺🇸 #usa