The First Book of Chronicles

These are my own contemplative thoughts. You might disagree and that’s OK!

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“…Go and count the Israelites from Beersheba to Dan. Then report back to me so I may know how many there are.” —1 Chronicles 21:2

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Most of the first part of Chronicles is a genealogical list, which I skipped in my reading. But then the book goes on to speak of David’s

rule as king. As king, David did the best he could, but like all humans he was not perfect. He’s written some of the most beautiful psalms (poems & songs) deticated to God,

because he truly felt he and God were in it together, he truly felt God’s presence in his life and it overwhelmed and inspired him. So the fact that he asks for his troops to be counted so he can measure his army’s strength is very unlike him. In this action he separates himself from God and is relying only on numbers, & on his own strength and pride. The simple definition of ‘sin’ is an act which separates us from God. So David was wrong to count the strength of his men, when he knew (and it had been proven to him many times) that God had his back, that God was with him. By this he pushed God away, thus separating himself from God, thus committing a ‘sin’. But don’t worry, our ‘sins’ are not counted by God. I think this shows that fact. That neither we should count against God, nor should we think God is counting against us. We simply try to keep our faith, and pray God will help us keep our faith in Him. We must hold fast to the sleeve of God’s robe or to God’s hand like a child who does not want to be lost in a world crowded with trivialities. In David’s case he said he was sorry to God and went on his merry way, hand in hand with Him (or if you like, Her) after this, and left with us his beautiful and inspiring dedications to his One & Only True Love.

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#bibleverse #bible #biblejournaling #church #episcopal #episcopalchurch #readersofinstagram #writersofinstagram #catholic #christ #god #jesuschrist #bookstagram #bibliophile #bookphotography

The Man Without a Country by Edward Everett Hale

A Man Without a Country by Edward Everett Hale is a story about a man accused of treason as accomplice to Aaron Burr. In the courtroom he announces that he wishes to never hear of the United States again. The judge grants him his wish, and he is sentenced to spend the rest of his life at sea. He creates for himself a cozy little room where he paints (I think) and reads, but no one is to mention any news from the United States. On his death bed he asks a young man to recount for him events in U. S. from 1807 on. This character enchanted me and stayed with me for years so that I based the protagonist from my most recent novella on him. I would encourage you to read it. It would only take a day or so. It is available online through free google books.

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This story first appeared in an 1863 issue of The Atlantic and was later printed in books. This copy is from 1920. I was drawn to its beautiful patriotic design. It’s considered a children’s military book but I remember liking it very much. .

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#bookstagram #bibliophile #oldbooks #vintage #aaronburr #hamilton #ship #nautical #bookshelf #readersofinstagram #writersofinstagram #writingcommunity #bookstagrammer #bookphotography #library #bookshop #america #war #patriots #patriotic #country

Taking a look at a very old post about Chattanooga.

“The more one gardens, the more one learns; and the more one learns, the more one realizes how little one knows. I suppose the whole of life is like that: the endless complications, the endless difficulties, the endless fight against one thing or another, whether it be green-fly on the roses or the complexity of human relationships.”

-Vita Sackville-West
A Joy of Gardening; 1958

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Back in 2017 for about a year I wrote a garden blog based on the garden writings of Vita Sackville-West. She owned Sissinghurst Castle and was a lover and friend of Virginia Woolf. I loved writing and photographing my garden, and it got me through some tough times. Something about the garden is very healing. This particular post of mine, however, was entitled “What Books Can Do”, which talks of my journey to the Chattanooga Battlefield. I thought it might interest some of you. Link:https://vintagehousebooks.com/2017/03/24/what-books-can-do/ At least you can browse through some of the photographs if you’re bored. I apologize if you encounter any of those nasty advertisements. 🤗

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#war #battlefield #civilwar #study #map #bookstagram #bibliophile #bookshelf #search #treasure #history #america #bookphotography #booknerdigans #booknerd #bookgeek #library #reading #readersofinstagram #writersofinstagram #bookstagrammer #booklover #bookreview #booksandloststories #chattanooga

The Book of Numbers

*I have no authority to teach you lessons from the Bible, I only hope you will find something useful. You might disagree with my interpretation and that’s OK!

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“When you cross the Jordan in to Canaan, drive out all the inhabitants of the land before you. Destroy all their carved images and their cast idols, and demolish all their high places.” –Numbers 33:51

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OK verses such as the above are what gives God a bad rap. It sounds violent and scary and seems to advertise war. But I will tell you that you must not look at the surface for the meaning in scripture, people that do often miss the truth and can interpret wrongly. Go deeper and this verse takes on a different shape entirely: Before your spirit can settle in peace with God and with yourself, drive out all things that are holding you back from a true and pure existence—all that you consider an ‘idol’ should be destroyed. For me, for a long time, my ‘idol’ getting traditionally published. I prayed and prayed for this to happen. But it wasn’t until I read this verse and saw my own folly in holding that goal on a pedestal of importance over many other things, and asking myself exactly WHY I wanted my books out there (was it for selfish reasons, or was my goal to help people?), that I was able to give up the idea and decide instead to be happy no matter what happened to all my books, poems, essays and dedicate my writing to the purpose of GOOD. Once I did this I found a publisher. Call that whatever you like, but I know where this gift came from. Have faith and hope that God will show you the way, but we must be patient and trust Him with all our hearts. That’s what I think anyway.

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#bookish #bible #christianity #religion #church #episcopal #episcopalchurch #catholic #jewish #moses #bookshelf #biblejournaling #journaling #booknerd #bookgeek #booknerdigans #bookphotography #bibliophile #library

Samuel Pepys’ Diary by Himself

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Samuel Pepys was a scoundrel! The way he went about seducing every woman he saw makes me think he had some sort of undiagnosed sex addiction. One woman had to threaten to poke him with her pin in church if he touched her again! 😆 .

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But it is a very good thing we have this diary, because this man, as arrogant as he was, had the mind to record ten years of really important British history. It is a wonderful little window into the English Restoration period by a middle to upper class parliament member. He records detailed accounts of the Black Plague, the London Fire, the trials of Oliver Cromwell, as well as the Dutch War. He describes heads on spikes and mundane things like his diet, the weather, the untidiness of his house, mites in his wigs, etc. Truly we are lucky to have such an honest account of a real life never to be lived again. .

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Pictured is the modern library edition from 1961? Among an old account book from 1880’s, a vintage print of a man seducing two women, and a cat’s skull my kids dug up in our backyard. .

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#bookish #bibliophile #bookstagram #book #reading #readingnook #reads #british #history #library #bookphotography #stillphotography #photography #vintage #bookshelf #readersofinstagram #writersofinstagram #diary #journaling #journal

Days of Wrath by Andre Malraux

🇺🇸 On a day just like today,

though the sky was bright,

clear, and blue,

I present to you this

truth in one, Andre Malraux.

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⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️A story about a communist prisoner in a Nazi concentration camp in the days leading up to World War II. Mostly it contains the protagonist’s rambling thoughts and efforts to not to go mad. Though I read it a couple years ago I remember enjoying it.

Pictured is the 1936 edition. The inscription indicates a brother giving this as a gift to his brother, or perhaps he’s a theologian, who seems to be going on a long journey. “Come back sober,” he writes.

Yes, I think we should all come back sober, like we did that day. We came back sober to our homes, to our radios, and television sets, but today as we do so, we come back with gratitude. .

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In memory of the 9/11 victims. 💕 🇺🇸 #usa